o365-cake

For those of us on the Technical side of the IT fence, we’re very used to being told that “we can’t have our cake and eat it too”.

For nearly every product, technology, technique, and service there are trade-offs, and in some cases particular features simply cannot be implemented due to one factor or another.

In the days before we referred to Hosting environments as “The Cloud”, Microsoft gave us a glimpse of what was to come later down the track, by giving us the Business Productivity Online Suite, or BPOS, which was the predecessor to Office 365.

One of the very early user generated concerns or issues with the use of BPOS was an annoyance with having to remember yet another password, or having to reset two passwords where before there was one. To compound matters, the BPOS username for all intents and purposes was very much like the stock standard username that users were accustoming to logging on to their PCs each and every morning with.

Chaos reigned… Fast forward to today with Office 365.

For a lot of businesses, the use of a Hybrid or Single Sign On environment so that exactly the same credentials are in use for both on-premises and Cloud resources is preferable.

Or put another way, users don’t have to be given the 45 minute sermon about the inner technical workings of a single sign on environment to understand why they have two passwords, we can simply tell them that they still have one password for most systems. Even after we introduce the Cloud, specifically Office 365.

But hang on, my company has been moved to the Office 365 Cloud, and my staff now have two passwords!!!

I’m glad you pointed that out.

You can move to a Single Sign On environment where users have a single password at any time, even if your businesses initial migration to Office 365 did not cater for that particular configuration. In fact a recent project undertaken by Diamond solved this very issue successfully.

In this particular instance, it turns out that you can indeed have your cake and eat it too.

Catch our blog on How exposed are your passwords, therefore your business?